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GEMS Awarded with IRMSA Award for the second year in a row

05 November 2019 Government Employees Medical Scheme (GEMS)

The industry body of risk management in South Africa, the Institute of Risk Management South Africa (IRMSA) has for the second year in a row recognised the Government Employees Medical Scheme (GEMS) with an award in the industries category for outstanding risk management in the healthcare sector.

The Scheme was recognised for its leading Claims Management Forum. The announcement was made at the award ceremony that took place on 1 November 2019 at Gallagher Convention Centre.

“It is an absolute honour for GEMS to receive this recognition from the IRMSA. This award is an acknowledgement of our efforts to manage risks effectively across strategic and operational levels”, says Dr Stan Moloabi; Chief Operations Officer at GEMS.

The IRMSA Annual Awards recognizes risk practitioners and organisations that have significantly contributed to the upliftment of risk management and the risk management profession in 2019. The awards also recognises individuals and organisations who seized the opportunities in responding to the country’s top risks.

GEMS has developed a comprehensive risk management plan that has enabled the Scheme to reach the 25 percent statutory reserve requirement while improving the financial stability of the Scheme in less than three years.

“This is a risk management success story, where the Scheme utilized operational & strategic risk management interventions to solve a significant business challenge that has yielded a positive outcome for the Scheme and most importantly our members and their beneficiaries”, concludes Dr Moloabi.

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QUESTION

In terms of vicarious liability, damages should not be borne by companies in all conditions, but only in those circumstances which it is reasonable for them to do so. Do you agree?

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As long as the employee is acting within the course and scope of his or her duty… the employer will be held liable.
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