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Event liability cover will be crucial when international acts perform in South Africa

10 June 2024 iTOO Special Risks
Mamoeti Nosi

Mamoeti Nosi

South Africans are in for a treat as numerous international acts are heading for our shores this year and even more artists are lined up for live performances next year, meaning that fans can look forward to a busy and vibrant entertainment calendar in the upcoming months.

Big international bands such Maroon 5, Keane and Meduza are scheduled to tour South Africa this year, while iconic rock groups like Green Day and The Offspring, among others, will perform here next year.

Not only does this put South Africa in the spotlight as world-renowned artists come here with a host of expectations, but it also places immense pressure on event organisers who must ensure that everything goes according to plan on the day of the performance.

This is according to Mamoeti Nosi, Product Head: Events at iTOO Special Risks, who points out that when it comes to hosting public events, things can go wrong and very often do go wrong – no matter how well organised and structured the event.

“Regardless of how risk-averse the event organisers might be, the risk of injury, death or property damage is all too real and must be taken into account when planning the event. Events such as these upcoming music concerts usually attract huge numbers of people to a venue, which changes the safety aspects and liability implications of the gathering,” says Nosi.

“We know that reputation and financial survival are two cornerstones in any eventing, recreational or exhibition business. What can take years to build can instantaneously be demolished or cripple your growth for years to come. If you’re an expert at events, you should consult an expert you can trust to provide insurance cover for them.”

Nosi says that event organisers should keep in mind that their exposure is generally uniquely related to whom they are hosting, what type of event it is and the type of venue where the event is being held.

She points out that ultimately event liability insurance coverage is a safety net and is no longer a nice to have, but an absolute must-have and is, in fact, a legal requirement. Previously, organisers either exercised caution or were simply just ignorant about the need to take out a policy, which was seen as either too expensive or not necessary. But event organisers cannot ignore their responsibilities.

“The harsh reality is that no matter how precise your risk management strategies are, anything, at any event can go wrong at any time. The Safety at Sports and Recreational Events Act of 2010, makes it a legal requirement to have event liability cover in place for certain events,” she says.

“Simply put, without event cover, your event cannot take place. Because not all eventing companies or events are the same, our special risks insurers can offer event organisers unique products, specially adapted to their needs, whether they’re hosting a once-off event or frequent ones.”

Nosi says that the upcoming events featuring international acts will be expected to run like well-oiled machines, while also meeting the expectations of both the attendees and artists.

“Event organisers can ill afford to leave anything to chance as there are too many variables and things that can go wrong. I would say that without proper event liability coverage, your event should not take place,” she concludes.

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